Why Shira’s Wrong

Frisk judge playing politics

By David B. Rivkin Jr. and Elizabeth Price Foley

The recent federal court rebuke of New York City’s stop-and-frisk tactics shows that many disputes are best resolved through politics, not lawsuits.

Courts resolve discrete controversies — whether existing law has been violated. They’re not equipped to answer questions about what the law “should” be. Judicial remedies are supposed to make plaintiffs whole, not rewrite policies wholesale.

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‘Stand your ground’ should be left to states: Column

President’s call to end such laws is federal government’s attempt to impose its will.
 
By David Rivkin Jr. and Andrew Grossman

After George Zimmerman’s acquittal for shooting Trayvon Martin, President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder urged the state of Florida to abandon its “stand your ground” law. If this were just taking advantage of a high-profile case to advance a political agenda, that would be bad enough. But the president’s and attorney general’s demands are inappropriate for a more fundamental reason: the federal government trying to impose its will on states.

The debate over where to draw the line between federal and state authority has been hard-fought from the early days of the republic. But the one area where state authority has gone unchallenged is in the power to define criminal laws. The states are better placed than the federal government to respond to local conditions and their citizens’ immediate concerns regarding public safety.

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President Obama’s suspension of the ObamaCare employer mandate

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David Rivkin appeared on the Opinion Journal Live to further discuss his previous Wall Street Journal article that explained President Obama’s suspension of the ObamaCare employer mandate.  Specifically, in the video Rivkin spoke about how this suspension will open the door to millions of Americans incurring a legal standing to sue.

To watch the video directly on the Opinion Journal, CLICK HERE >>

Why the President’s ObamaCare Maneuver May Backfire

By postponing the employer mandate, Obama has given millions of Americans the legal standing to sue.
 

By: David B. Rivkin Jr. and Lee A. Casey

President Obama’s announcement on July 2 that he is suspending the Affordable Care Act’s employer health-insurance mandate may well have exposed his actions to judicial review—even though that is clearly what he sought to avoid.

The health-care reform law’s employer mandate requires businesses with more than 50 employees to provide a congressionally prescribed set of health-insurance benefits or pay a penalty calculated at about $2,000 per employee. The law was to take effect on Jan. 1, 2014, but Mr. Obama has “postponed” its application until 2015. His aim, the administration said, was to give employers more time to comply with the new rules. But it was also seen as a way to avoid paying at least part of ObamaCare’s mounting political price in the 2014 congressional elections.

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The Economics of Health Care in America

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David Rivkin appeared on Bloomberg TV with infectious disease and public health specialist Celine Gounder, and Bloomberg’s Shannon Pettypiece and Pimm Fox to talk about the future of Medicaid expansion and the Affordable Care Act.

To watch the entire clip on Bloomberg TV, CLICK HERE >>

David Rivkin on the Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act

Congressional law attorney David Rivkin spoke on Bill Bennett’s “Morning in America,” about the court’s decision on voting rights. David compared the history of voting rights to the current societal environment. David clarifies the necessity of the previous laws and how they are no longer relevant, as they have succeeded.